• Tue28April 2015
    2COMMENTS
  • Passionate and altruistic? Consider a career in fitness

    Hands up if you’ve ever considered a career in fitness?

    It can seem like an extremely attractive proposition, especially with the latest findings from a survey, conducted by SkillsActive and the Exercise, Movement and Dance Partnership (EMDP), revealing that 70% of fitness professionals want to work in the fitness industry because they have a genuine passion for fitness. What’s more, almost half (44%) surveyed said they entered the sector because they wanted to help people.

    A career where you love what you do and you can motivate others to reach their goals – how many of us can say the same about our current occupation?

    Could you be the next "Mad Lizzie"? (TV AM's fitness instructor in the 80s)

    Could you be the next “Mad Lizzie”? (TV AM’s fitness instructor in the 80s)

    Not forgetting that fitness offers flexibility in terms of working hours, so you can fit it around say the kids and other responsibilities.

    Of course, there are downsides to this. You may have to wake-up slightly earlier to train a client before work or head to the park to take a class early on a Sunday morning when your friends are out having brunch.

    And as this survey reveals, the fitness industry is also relatively low-paid. According to the Working In Fitness Survey 2015, average full-time fitness professionals earn £22,700, which is below the UK average salary of £26,500 (source ONS 2012). But if you consider the way health and fitness is flourishing at the moment, the potential to earn enough to be comfortable is ripe.

    Just think of how many studios have opened in London over the past two years and new events such as the Nike 10k and Be:Fit popping up to feed the booming health and fitness market.

    Whether they are successful or not is down to how they market themselves but what this does show is that the appetite among women and men to be healthier is there – being fit is an integral part of what our generations perceives as the right life/work balance.

    Corporates are also taking note that a healthier workforce equals a more productive workforce and less absenteeism. Health insurance companies are now offering rewards for their customers who participate regularly in Parkruns or can prove they have met a target of 10,000 steps a day.

    Ten or even five years ago fitness was something of a side line or only for diehard fanatics, fast-forward to today and you’ll find the climate has changed dramatically. It is now inclusive and available to everyone, no matter what shape or size.  For those who are passionate about motivating everybody, taking on this industry can be potentially rewarding on every level.

    It’s little wonder that 40% of respondents to the survey, who have been working in the sector for more than ten years, have no plans to leave in the next five.

    So what do you think? Could or do you work in the fitness industry? What stops your from following this career path?

    Before you answer these questions, take a look a this infographic of the Working in Fitness Survey 2015, which surveyed over 31,000 members of the Register of Exercise Professionals (REPs):

    Working in Fitness infographic demonstrates the findings of a Working in Fitness Survey 2015, conducted by SkillsActive and the Exercise, Movement and Dance Partnership (EMDP)

    Working in Fitness infographic demonstrates the findings of a Working in Fitness Survey 2015, conducted by SkillsActive and the Exercise, Movement and Dance Partnership (EMDP)

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